Remembering
  •         Mary  Lou  Alberti
  •         Jean  Frances  Albrecht
  •         Lorraine  Elizabeth  Balin
  •         Maureen  Opal  Bayly
  •         Marie  A.  Bevacqua
  •         Larry  Frank  Blake
  •         Ozzie  Boyle
  •         Lois  Anne  Carrothers
  •         Harold  Dean  Carrothers
  •         Shirley  Alexander  Darden
  •         Leopoldo  S.  Del Rosario
  •         Raymond  Ariel  Eaks
  •         Philip  A  Erickson
  •         Grace  Laurea  Fisk
  •         Charles  Fox
  •         Dakotah  Peyton  George
  •         Vernon  Oswald  Gestson
  •         Alfred  Henry  Gibbs
  •         Lois  J. "Nita"  Gienger
  •         Susan  Emerson  Gould
  •         Carol  Anne  Greenwood
  •         Warren  Thomas  Henderson
  •         William  E.  Herb
  •         Velma  Julia  Jeremiah
  •         Arthur  Chester  King, Jr.
  •         Michael  James  Langton
  •         Geraldine  Ana Ortiz y  LaPierre
  •         Matthew  LeRay  LeBar
  •         Mary  Jane  Lee
  •         Leo  "Bill"  LeFevre
  •         John  Harvard  Lomax
  •         Aimee  K.  Macdonald
  •         Cheryl  Kaye  Monroe
  •         Lam  Ngoc  Nguyen
  •         Agnes  Marie  Olseene
  •         Vincent  James  Palermo, Jr.
  •         Eamon  DeValera  Parsons
  •         Mary Ellen  Paulson
  •         Dolores  Elaine  Peskura
  •         Jocelyn  Villoso  Pilapil
  •         Robert  Cecil  Preston
  •         Lavar  Franklin  Pulley
  •         Jade  Karen  Reed
  •         Elizabeth "Betty"  Mae  Robeson
  •         June  Marie  Robinson
  •         Mary  Louise  Rogers
  •         Denise  Anne  Sampson
  •         Gerald  Raymond  Santwire
  •         Patricia  Satterlee
  •         Flash  Everette  Scaff, Sr.
  •         E.  Milton  Scott
  •         Anne  Margaret  Sessions
  •         Cecelia  Tougas  Smersh
  •         Byron  Gene  Strange
  •         Marial  LaRue  Stroschein
  •         Joan  Angevine  Swift
  •         Sarah  Frances  Walsh
  •         Robert  Edward  Weborg
  •         Mike  Wilcox, Jr.
  •         Edward  Wojack
  •         Lisa  Katherine  Young
  • Funerals: The Personal Memorial

    Funerals have changed over time. The early settlers held at-home gatherings to mark the death of a family member. For later generations the funeral evolved to a much more ambitious event held in a church or funeral home. Funeral rites were strictly followed.

    Today, the funeral is much more broadly defined. Of course, it can be a strictly religious observance, or it can be a simple gathering of friends to informally share remembrances. The modern funeral can take many forms that bring great meaning to the experience. We are no longer constrained by a narrow definition.

    Funerals or memorial services can be held in a variety of places, such as churches, auditoriums, local restaurants, a private club, or the family home. No matter where they are held, they serve a common purpose. Funerals can help to:

    • Confront a painful loss in a healthy way.
    • Share the burden of grief and receive support from family and friends.
    • Acknowledge that the life of the deceased had purpose and meaning.
    • Say good-bye.
    • Prepare to move forward through the grief process and on to a healthy life.

    At Beck's Funeral Home we are committed to helping you make the choices that feel right for you. We'll do our best to be helpful and understanding of your personal needs. We'll carefully explain the choices you have available, and we'll see that your wishes are carried out.

    Remember, funerals are about healing and health.

    Why have a Funeral? Funerals as a cultural ritual contribute greatly to processing the pain of loss and help us move through the denial stage of the grieving process. A funeral is an undeniable acknowledgement that a death has occurred. In fact, not attending the funeral of a loved one because we wish to deny the death, or can't deal with the pain of acceptance can cause emotional trouble later on. Unresolved grief doesn't just go away.

    A funeral provides a place to experience the care and comfort of family and friends, to know we are not alone in our sorrow, and that our feelings of loss are shared by others. Funerals provide a symbolic opportunity to say good-bye to someone who was important to us, to mark the transition that bridges the person being physically in our lives to the person being remembered spiritually in our hearts.

    The actual form of the funeral has changed over time as our culture has evolved. It is no longer thought of as a dark and somber affair, but rather an event which reflects the customs, lifestyle and values of the person being remembered. It can take any form from a strictly religious observance to an informal celebration of a unique and well-lived life.

    Your Beck's funeral director will help you in selecting the type of funeral service which best suits your emotional as well as your financial needs.